Business

  • Industry
    • Type of target industries being located per region/province
      • Manufacturing (Precision Assembly, Food Processing, Bottling Companies, Public Markets)
      • Services (Medical Services/Facilities, Water/Power Supply/Communication)
      • Information and Communication Technology ICT (Financial Services/Banks)
      • Human Resource Development (Schools and Training Institutions)
      • Industrial Estate (Malls)
      • Agri-Business
      • Eco-Tourism (Hotels, Restaurants, Heritage/Tourism Destination)
  • Labor Costs
    • Unskilled Labor Costs (Php)
    • Skilled Labor Costs (Php)
    • Technical Labor Costs (Php)
    • Management Labor Costs (Php)
    • Average Median Income (Php)
  • Minimum Daily Wage:
    SECTOR RATES
    NON AGRICULTURE  
    Establishment with total assets of P30 million or more Php 302.00
    Establishments with total assets of less than P30 million Php 294.50
    AGRICULTURE  
    Plantation Php 272.00
    Non Plantation Php 256.00
    PRIVATE HOSPITALS  
    Establishment with 20 or more bed capacity Php 293.00
    Establishments with less than 20 bed capacity Php 278.00
    RETAIL/SERVICE  
    Establishment with 16 or more employees Php 291.00
    Establishment with less than 16 employees Php 277.00
    COTTAGE/HANDICRAFT Php 256.00
    Source: Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE)
  • Labor Conditions
    • Demographics-Population - 269,365 (2005 Population)
    • Demographics-Population Growth - 2.71%
    • Demographics-Labor Pool Size - 161,619 (2007 data)
    • Demographics-Labor Pool Growth - no available data
    • Demographics-Unemployment - 2.61 (2009 data using projected population)
    • Demographics-Education Level
      • Enrolment Data (2009):
      • Day Care Centers – 2,586
      • Public Pre-elementary – 3,972
      • Public Primary – 31,957
      • Public Secondary – 15,064
      • City College – 642
      • SPED Classes – 177
    • Skilled Labor Availability
    • Technical Labor Availability
    • Management Labor Availability
      • % of Specialist Graduates
      • Business Administration – 34.6%
      • Engineering and Technology – 9.1%
      • Math and IT – 8.5%
      • Medical and Allied Fields – 29.2%
    • English Language Proficiency – no data available
    • No. of Schools – 230 (including training institutions)
    • No. of College Graduates per Year – 2,252 (2009 data)
  • Utilities
    • Connection fees for water (Php)
      • Application Fee (CSFP Water District)
      • Residential – 2,600.00
      • Commercial – 2,900.00
      • Connection fees for telephone (Php)
      Initial Charges Monthly Rental Application
      Residential Php 607.25 Php 1,100
      Commercial Php 1,100 Php 1,500
      Source: PLDT
    • Electricity Providers in the Area - San Fernando Electric Light and Power Corporation Inc. (SFELAPCO)
    • Available telecommunications providers in the area - PLDT, Digitel, Bayantel, Globe, Smart, Sun, Comclark
    • Electric Power Availability
      • The power distribution franchise in the City of San Fernando is held by the San Fernando Electric Light and Power Company (SFELAPCO). Of the 35 barangays, 34 are served by SFELAPCO. Barangay Pulung Bulu, due to its proximity with Angeles City, is served by the Angeles Electric Corporation with some portions of Barangay Telabastagan.
    • Electric Power Capacity - Total electrical use in kw/hr = 31,964,622 (SFELAPCO)
    • Electric Power Costs per hour (Php per hour)
    • San Fernando Electric Lights & Power Co., Inc. Rate Schedule
        Residential GS-1 GS-2 GS-3 GS-4 GS-5 S.I.S L.I.S V.L.I.S Street Lights-1 Street Lights-2 89-KV
      Gen.Charge(P/kWH) 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927 2.4927
      Trans Charge
      P/kW           208.63 209.69 191.22 184.73     209.69
      P/kWH 0.9794 0.4380 0.8114 0.8460 0.9714 0.4133 0.4423 0.4085 0.4196 0.9282 0.9356 0.2996
      Distribution Charge
      P/kW           106.56 108.29 105.48 105.44     105.38
      P/kWH 0.8016 0.6019 0.4540 0.5134 0.5202 0.2151 0.2321 0.2300 0.2444 0.6408 0.5109 0.1537
      Supply Charge/Mo.
      Per Customer Except Res. 0.2884 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79 48.79
      Metering Charge
      Per Month P5.00 86.84 86.84 86.84 86.84 1,668.38 1,668.38 1,668.38 1,668.38 0.00 0.00 1,668.38
      P/kWH 0.4598                      
      System Loss Charge 0.4579 0.3253 0.2616 0.3105 0.3173 0.2728 0.3693 0.2153 0.3641 0.3245 0.3267 0.0188
      Cross Subsidy (0.7868) 0.7707 0.0888 (0.0252) 0.3362 0.4023 (0.6529) 0.3067 0.4732 (1.4584) (2.3582) 0.3212
      MRR (0.30)                      
      Lifeline Subsidy P/kWH   0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665 0.0665
      0-100 kWh 0.00                      
      In excess of 100 0.0665                      
      Universal Charge
      Missionary Elec. 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373 0.0373
      Environmental Charge 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025 0.0025
      Note: Plus National and Local franchise tax
    • Water Availability
      • The Local Water District (WD) supplies the drinking water for most of the households in the City of San Fernando. About 48.84% percent of the total households rely on the local water district for their drinking water; private shallow well at 17 percent; private deepwell at 13 percent; public deepwell at 10 percent; and public shallow well at 10 percent.
    • Water Capacity - Total Daily Water Consumption = 20,040,186 cu.m.
    • Water Cost (Php) – CSFP Water District Rates
    • Type of Use Rate (Php)
      Residential & Government
      >  Minimum (10 cu.m.) 175.00 – 12,600.00
      >  Commodity Charge  
      11 – 20 cu.m. 19.65
      21 – 30 cu.m. 22.25
      31 – 40 cu.m. 25.15
      41 – 50 cu.m. 28.50
      51 up 32.20
      Commercial A
      >  Commodity Charge  
      10 – 20 cu.m. 39.30
      21 – 30 cu.m. 44.50
      31 – 40 cu.m. 50.30
      41 – 50 cu.m. 57.00
      51 up 64.50
      Commercial B  
      >  Commodity Charge  
      10 – 20 cu.m. 34.35
      21 – 30 cu.m. 38.90
      31 – 40 cu.m. 44.00
      41 – 50 cu.m. 49.85
      51 up 56.35
      Commercial C
      >  Commodity Charge  
      10 – 20 cu.m. 29.45
      21 – 30 cu.m. 33.35
      31 – 40 cu.m. 37.70
      41 – 50 cu.m. 42.75
      51 up 48.30
      Amount of Charges (Php):
      PARTICULARS Residential/Government Commercial
      Registration Fee 200.00 200.00
      Tapping & Installation Fee 600.00 600.00
      Angle Valve 400.00 400.00
      Cost of Water Meter
      ½” diameter 1,400.00 1,400.00
      ¾” diameter 2,000.00 2,000.00
      1” diameter 5,000.00 5,000.00
      2” diameter 24,000.00 24,000.00
      Road Crossing with Pavement (Boring and Jetting) *Depending on the Actual Survey…
      Tapping or Service Connection Materials
    • Telecom Availability
      • Despite the stiff competition offered by mobile phones over land line telephones, landline telephone subscribers in the City of San Fernando continue to increase. The combined subscribers of Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. (PLDT) and DIGITEL communications as of 2005 were about 12,500 for a subscribed telephone density of 6 per 100 populations.
    • Usage charge of broadband per month - DSL Lines = Php 999.00 – 4,000.00
  • Logistics by region
    • Road Traffic Conditions (Volume of Traffic, Impact on Trucking Commute)
    • Number and Type of Vehicles:
      Type Registered Vehicles
      Cars 79,020
      Utility Vehicle 233,619
      Sport Utility Vehicle 20,947
      Trucks 49,066
      Buses 4,060
      Motorcycles / Tricycles 449,174
      Trailers 4,114
      Total 840,000
    • Presence of Industrial Gas Providers (i.e. Providers of Nitrogen, Argon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, etc.) – no data available
    • List of Industrial Development Zones and Parks:
      • The Angeles Industrial Park (AIP), formerly Holy Angel Industrial Park, is at the crossroads of City of San Fernando, Angeles City and Bacolor. It is the only industrial estate in this city. Although politically a part of Calibutbut, Bacolor, Pampanga, it is accessible only through the McArthur Highway in Telabastagan, City of San Fernando. Also, it is being served by the PLDT of City of San Fernando.
      • For the recreation and leisure facilities:
        1. Hilaga Northern Philippines, formerly Paskuhan Village
        2. The Bren Z. Guiao Sports Complex and Convention Center
        3. The Benigno Aquino Hall, located at the provincial capitol grounds
        4. Macario Arnedo Park
  • Real Estate and Construction By Region
    • Land Availability
    • Type Area (Hectares) Rate per square meter
      Residential 1,604.41 950
      Commercial 340.47 6,000
        Rice Land (Irrigated) = 63,800
      Rice Land (Un-Irrigated)/Corn Land = 46,130
      Agricultural/Agri-industrial 1,764.06 Sugar Land = 53,880
        Horticulture = 33,880
      Farm Lot = 190,240
      Source: Proposed CSFP Comprehensive Land Use Plan 2007-2011
    • Land Lease vs. Land Purchase locale (Php)
    • Land Lease Cost or Land Use Right (Php)
    • Average Land Purchase Cost
    • Existing Facility Availability
    • Building Construction Cost
    • Quality of Life By Region
      • Compare locations and their prevalence of community infrastructure to support quality of life (i.e. hospitals, schools, parks, etc.)
        • The city continued to strengthen its role as the education center of the province. Academic institutions from elementary to tertiary levels are found throughout the City of San Fernando. As of 2009, there are 49 Day Care Centers, 55 pre-elementary, 66 elementary, 25 secondary and 35 tertiary schools (including training institutions offering vocational courses) in San Fernando.
        • The City serves as the provincial capital and site of most regional government agencies of Central Luzon. Its population has easy access to higher levels of health services such as specialty hospitals. It also hosts many health facilities e.g., clinics and health centers/stations. As of 2005, there are nine (9) hospitals, 67 clinics, and 4 rural health units operating in the City of San Fernando. The nine hospitals have a combined bed capacity of 616, two of which are government run.
        • Among its famous recreation leisure facilities, the City has Hilaga Northern Philippines, formerly Paskuhan Village, a first of its kind in Asia. It is a tribute to Filipino craftsmen particularly the famous lantern makers of Pampanga as expressed by the star-shaped pavilion at the center of the village with its Gardens of the world and year round Christmas decorations.
        • The Bren Z. Guiao Sports Complex and Convention Center, an impressive multi-purpose complex with imposing venues for concerts, convention, basketball games, beauty pageants and other sport activities. The 3,000-seat, air-conditioned convention center inside the complex is one of Pampanga’s pride.
        • The Benigno Aquino Hall, located at the Provincial Capitol grounds was rehabilitated and expanded into a state-of-the-art conference center after it was ruined by lahar flows in 1995.
        • The commercial/business center of the city goes as far as the stretch of City of San Fernando proper to Barangay Sindalan, about 8 kilometers in length and the Gapan-San Fernando-Olongapo (GSO) Road from Barangay Magliman to the Mexico boundary where the SM Department Store and Robinsons Department Store are located. Aside from being the provincial capital, it is also the Regional Government Center of Central Luzon, where the Regional Development Council III (RDC-III) has set aside a portion of land for the Regional Offices of national agencies operating in the region. This has been a major influence in the economic development of the city.
      • Describe the overall life in the area
        • Some will argue that even if the City of San Fernando will not do anything, development and progress will spontaneously occur due mainly to its strategic location. That is true. But the negative impacts of urban sprawl, congestions, and conflicting use, among others will be inevitably experienced once the people of the City of San Fernando elected just to “wait for the things to happen”. The benefits of agglomeration and fruits of development can only be achieved and experienced, respectively, if its people will be responsible and proactive enough to “make things happen” within the principles of COMMON GOOD and not within the ambits of personal and individual glory.
        • Like any other areas in the country, the pattern of settlement in the City of San Fernando originates from the Poblacion and radiates outward. As built-up areas grow and move away from the center, distantly located areas that are near or along roads directly leading to the Poblacion are the next best alternatives. The reason for this is very obvious – access and proximity. At present, settlements are amassed along major roads (i.e. Mac Arthur Hi-way and GSO road), secondary and feeder roads, and in the Poblacion. The eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991 altered the urbanization pattern of the City of San Fernando especially those areas in the southern bank of GSO road down to the Poblacion, and all the way to the southern-most border of the city. While the threats of lahar flows greatly diminished over time, these areas are still being perennially flooded. Because of this, the process of expansion, densification and in-filling in the original built-up areas was arrested and moved to other alternative sites. Expansion of settlement northward accelerated starting from GSO road along the Mac Arthur Hi-way and its secondary or feeder roads.
      • Government Support
        • Local government incentives to investors
          • Local Investments and Incentives Code by the City of San Fernando, Pampanga